Covid-19 Information – Home

Use the tabs across the top of the screen to navigate this site. Some pages are under construction, but they can still be viewed.

Note: This website was made to provide people with accurate, reliable, and trustworthy content. However, it is only a general guide and not meant to be used as a substitute (or supplement) for official medical advice.

  • The COVID Tracking Project has historical data on cases, tests, hospitalizations, and outcomes.
  • A COVID dashboard with Global map-clickable data on cases and outcomes (Deaths and Recoveries), led by Johns Hopkins University
*Data is no longer tracked on this site.  See the STATISTICS/TRACKING tab for the latest.
  • Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine. Approved for Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA on December 11, 2020. Two doses three weeks apart – for latest details see Pfizer factsheet.
  • Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine. Approved for Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA on December 18, 2020. Two doses one month apart – for latest details see Moderna factsheet.
  • Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine. Approved for Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA on February 27, 2021. Single dose – for latest details see Janssen factsheet.

Tests (PCR vs. Antibody)

Source: FDA.gov

Sensitivity and specificity can be easy to mix up. In the most general terms, sensitivity is finding a positive test in a person that really is sick. Specificity is finding a negative result in someone who is not infected. A good test will do both. No test is perfect, but a RT-PCR/molecular test is considered to be more accurate than a rapid antigen test.

Antibody tests check if you have been exposed to Covid in the past, so they don’t necessarily tell you if you are currently infected.